Michael Curia

Michael Curia: The Invisible Man

21 February, 2016

The Invisible Man
Chapter Seven
The Unveiling of the Stranger

I interpreted a H. G. Wells novel through finding a distinct similarity in the persona of the invisible man and a Baskerville lowercase g.

The typography in each book has been composed by hand using letterpress. By printing in black ink and blind embossing, the meticulous process of using letterpress is the invisible work behind my creation.

In the story, the invisible man dresses himself in a long coat and bandages to disguise himself from being invisible. Society rejects him as a strange and peculiar fellow.

Michael Curia The Invisible Man
Michael Curia The Invisible Man

The Baskerville lowercase g has many quirks to it; such as the ear, the open tail, and a bowl that sits above the baseline. My concept presents the g as a metaphor for how the invisible man feels in the story.

The g is missing from the invisible man, but is the only letter printed in the visible man. This represents the way the character in the book drifts in and out of visibility.

Michael Curia The Invisible Man

The books force the viewer to question why the g appears to be missing from one book, yet visible in the other. the same way the people in the village questioned who the invisible man is.

Michael Curia The Invisible Man
Michael Curia The Invisible Man
Michael Curia The Invisible Man

Michael Curia is a graphic designer and creative thinker. See more of his work: michaelcuriadesign.com

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